Greek Mythology/Hera/Mythology Interpretation

Those Insightful Greeks 4
    Greek mythology is very practically oriented.
Instead of glorifying the gods as others have done,
Greek deities were deliberately portrayed imperfect so
that humans would be able to learn from them. High and
mighty the gods may be, with great powers and beauty,
but they have challenges to overcome as much as the
rest of us, and as many times as not, they fail in
those.
The Power to Express
    Hera, the Queen of the gods is also one of the
most unfortunate among the Olympians. Coaxed by the
cunning thunder god Zeus into marrying her, she is
later subjected to a series of betrayals by her
husband. Moreover, she is never allowed to express her
disgruntlement properly. Each time she would try, the
mightiest of all gods would punish her. Forced to
suppress her pain of betrayal Hera resorts to
violence.
    She is perceived by the Greeks as the most
bothersome and cruel goddess of all. The heroes who
win her favor usually regret it later; the prophets
endowed with her gift of prophecy always preach doom
and gloom. Since the emotion of hurt is not able to
come out the right way, the goddess brings it into all
of her dealings. However well she means, she spreads
her pain around, sometimes even unconsciously. Her
case teaches us another important lesson. Many people
hold the erroneous belief that if they cannot fix the
situation that bothers them, there is no point in
expressing their feeling of upset.
    They should ask themselves then if there is a
point in keeping quiet, if that helps to resolve
anything. Sometimes, aside from false considerations of comfort,
the answer would be ‘no.’ As for
expressing the emotions, there is a very clear purpose
to it. Expressing them in the right manner lets those
feelings go. It vacates that space within which they
occupy, gives the freedom to think and concentrate on
the solution to the problem.
Proper expression makes
sure that wherever the person goes, he doesn’t
unintentionally carry the pain around. The great
goddess failed to learn that lesson, how about you?
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